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Thursday, February 3, 2011

Halle Berry's Custody Battle Turns Ugly, Oscar Winner's Ex Allegedly Called Her N-Word

It's becoming a war of words between Oscar winner Halle Berry and her ex, Gabriel Aubry, in the custody battle for their daughter, Nahla.
While Berry recently stated that she has "serious concerns for her daughter's well-being while in the care of her father for any extended period of time and is prepared to take all necessary steps to protect her," Aubry shot back with his own statement.
"While Gabriel is disappointed in Halle's decision to falsely malign him publicly and for her own purposes, he refuses to be pulled into her dispute over a canceled film production," his rep said in the statement.

"Gabriel also refuses to air their issues in the press as he believes this may ultimately harm their daughter. The fact is that Gabriel is a caring father who shares custody of Nahla."

Halle Through The Years
Warner Bros. / Everett Collection / MGM
17 photos
 
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Halle Berry: Movies Through The Years
From her striking debut in Spike Lee's controversial 'Jungle Fever' up to her recent dramatic turn in 'Things We Lost in the Fire,' Black Voices takes look at the film career of the one and only Halle Berry.
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Halle Through The Years
Halle Berry: Movies Through The Years
From her striking debut in Spike Lee's controversial 'Jungle Fever' up to her recent dramatic turn in 'Things We Lost in the Fire,' Black Voices takes look at the film career of the one and only Halle Berry.
Warner Bros. / Everett Collection / MGM
BlackVoices.com

Halle Through The Years

Halle Berry: Movies Through The Years
From her striking debut in Spike Lee's controversial 'Jungle Fever' up to her recent dramatic turn in 'Things We Lost in the Fire,' Black Voices takes look at the film career of the one and only Halle Berry.
'Jungle Fever'
This 1991 Spike Lee film was Berry's film debut. Friends and family of a married black architect (Wesley Snipes) react to his affair with his Italian secretary (Annabella Sciorra). Berry went without makeup to play the role of crack addict Vivian, opposite Samuel L. Jackson's Gator.
'Strictly Business'
In this 1991 romantic comedy, Berry played Natalie, a club girl being pursued by Joseph C. Phillips. The film was directed by Kevin Hooks and also starred Tommy Davidson, Anne-Marie Johnson, David Marshall Grant, Jon Cypher and Samuel L. Jackson. The film features a young Sam Rockwell and the R&B group Jodeci right before their musical success.
'Alex Haley's Queen'
Berry won her first NAACP Image Award for her starring role in this 1993 miniseries about the life of a young bi-racial slave girl named Queen. Based on the life of Haley's paternal grandmother, 'Queen' also starred Danny Glover, Jasmine Guy, Tim Daly, Martin Sheen, Paul Winfield, Raven-Symone and Anne Margaret.
'Losing Isaiah'
Directed by Stephen Gyllenhaal, Jake and Maggie's dad, Berry starred with Jessica Lange in this 1995 drama about the natural and adoptive mothers of a young boy involved in a bitter custody battle. The film also starred David Strathairn, Cuba Gooding Jr., Samuel L. Jackson, Joie Lee and Regina Taylor.
'BAPS'
This 1997 comedy was directed by Robert Townsend and written by Troy Beyer. Wearing a huge blond wig, Berry plays Nisi, a young woman who, along with her friend Mickey (Natalie Desselle-Reid), has dreams of opening the world's first combination hair salon-soul food restaurant. In an unusual turn of events, the pair end up becoming "black American princesses" while assisting a Beverly Hills butler and caring for an aging millionaire who welcomes them into his mansion.
'The Wedding'
In this 1998 television miniseries, directed by Charles Burnett and produced by Oprah Winfrey's Harpo Productions, Berry appears alongside Eric Thai and Lynn Whitfield in a story about marriage, race, and family set in Martha's Vineyard during the 1950s.
'The Rich Man's Wife'
Berry starred in this 1996 thriller as the title character suspected of killing her husband. The film also stars Peter Greene, Clive Owen, Christopher McDonald and Frankie Faison.
'Bulworth'
Berry had a supporting role in this 1998 political satire, which was written, directed and co-produced by Warren Beatty, who also starred in the film. The movie follows California Sen. Jay Billington Bulworth (Beatty) as he runs for re-election. Berry plays Nina, a young campaigner who becomes involved with the rapping politician. Also featured in the film are Oliver Platt, Don Cheadle, Paul Sorvino, Jack Warden and Isaiah Washington.
'Introducing Dorothy Dandridge'
Berry's career took off after she won an Emmy, Golden Globe, SAG Award and an NAACP Image Award for her role in the 1999 title film. The picture follows Dandridge's career through her early days on the club circuit with her sister to her turn in movies, which included becoming the first black actress nominated for an Academy Award for best actress in 1954's 'Carmen Jones.' The film also starred Brent Spiner Klaus Maria Brandauer, Obba Babatundé, Loretta Devine, Cynda Williams and LaTanya Richardson.

"Halle's continuing allegations in the press are untrue and irresponsible," Aubry's rep added.
Meanwhile, TMZ is reporting that Aubry has called Halle the N-word, and routinely demeaned her with other vulgarities.
Supposedly, he would also call her a "f**king b***h" and other expletives. And the vulgarities are not limited to face-to-face confrontations. There are vulgar text messages as well, states the site.
Since splitting up last April, Aubry filed court papers in December to be formally recognized as Nahla's father and is seeking joint legal and physical custody.

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